Western Kansas Agricultural Research Centers
Water Resources Management

 

 
The goal of the irrigation and water management research program at the SWREC, Garden City is to develop management strategies and technologies that maximize net returns per unit of water applied. Currently our research is focused on developing: 1) deficit irrigation management strategies for grains (e.g., corn, wheat and grain sorghum), forages (e.g., forage sorghum) and alternative crops (e.g., canola), 2) advanced irrigation scheduling technologies including combining ET-based scheduling with ground and airborne thermal infrared and multispectral remote sensing of plant water status as well as use of multi parameter soil water sensors, 3) decision support tools based on dynamic cropping systems simulation models, experimental data and historical weather records and 4) soil and water conservation practices for water limited environments.
 
Current Projects

Deficit Irrigation Management for Grains, Forages and Alternative Crops


Grains
1. Response of drought tolerant and conventional corn hybrids to full and deficit irrigation (Funded by USDA Ogallala Aquifer Project)


Goal: Update irrigation vs. yield production functions for corn to facilitate water and land allocation under limited water supplies.


Objectives are to:
1. Develop production functions for drought tolerant and conventional corn hybrids.
2. Evaluate water productivity of the two hybrids.
3. Quantify differences in crop growth (biomass & LAI).

 

2. Wheat yield response to deficit irrigation and fungicide (Funded by K-State Research and Extension and BASF Inc.,)


Goal: Increase wheat yields under full and deficit irrigation by minimizing yield limiting factors such as wheat diseases.


Objectives are to:
1. Generate yield vs. irrigation production functions for wheat treated with & without priaxor fungicide.

2. Response of grain sorghum to full and deficit irrigation (Funded by the Kansas Grain Sorghum Commission)


Goal: Develop management practices for increasing grain sorghum yield under full and limited irrigation.

Objectives are to:
1. Generate yield vs. irrigation production functions for new grain sorghum hybrids.
2. Evaluate economics of grain sorghum production under diminished well capacities.

 

Forages


 

1. Forage sorghum production under full and deficit irrigation (Funded by the USDA Ogallala Aquifer Project)


Goal: Generate information on forage sorghum production under full and deficit irrigation in southwest Kansas.


Objectives are to:
1. Generate yield vs. irrigation production functions for BMR and non-BMR forage sorghum hybrids.
2. Determine the effect of deficit irrigation on forage sorghum feed quality.
3. Compare water use of forage sorghum (intended for use as silage) and corn silage.
4. Perform economic analysis for forage sorghum production under limited water.

 

 

 


Alternative crops


1. Canola response to full and deficit irrigation (Funded by the USDA Ogallala Aquifer Project)


Goal: Generate information on canola water use & production economics under full and deficit irrigation in southwest Kansas.


Objectives are to:
1. Generate yield vs. irrigation production functions for open pollinated and hybrid canola varieties.
2. Determine effect of late season irrigation termination on yield.
3. Evaluate the economics of canola production at different well capacities.

 
Advanced Irrigation scheduling


Integrated Irrigation Scheduling for Corn (Funded by Kansas Water Resources Institute)
Goal: Increase reliability of ET-based irrigation scheduling by combining it with soil-, and plant-based water status monitoring.


Objectives are to:
1. Assess the effect of irrigation scheduling based on infrared thermometry, soil water sensing and ET on growth, yield, and water productivity of corn.
2. Determine total seasonal irrigation water application by each scheduling method.


  
Soil and Water Conservation Engineering


Demonstrate the interactions between reduced tillage, soil water storage and nutrient leaching (Funded by the USDANRCS Conservation Innovation Grant program)


Goal: Evaluate the effect of different tillage methods on soil and water conservation under limited irrigation environments.


Objectives are to:
1. Demonstrate the impact of reduced tillage (no-till and strip till) and residue cover on precipitation capture and soil water storage using high temporal resolution (hourly) measurements of soil water from multi-parameter sensors.
2. Quantify the impact of integrating reduced tillage and limited irrigation on crop yield and crop water productivity and develop enterprise budgets under this management strategy.

 
Faculty

Isaya Kisekka
Agricultural Engineer
SW Research Center
620-276-8286
ikisekka@ksu.edu
Research Homepage

 

Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Klocke, N., R. Currie, and I. Kisekka. 2014. Corn, Wheat, and Grain Sorghum Response to Irrigation from Limited Water Supplies and No-Till Management. Applied Eng. Agriculture SW-10582-2014 (Accepted).


Kisekka, I., K.W. Migliaccio, R. Muñoz-Carpena, B. Schaffer, Y. C. Li, T. H. Boyer. 2014. Simulating water table response to proposed changes in surface water management in the C-111 agricultural basin of south Florida. Journal of Agricultural Water Management. 146:185–200.


Kisekka, I., K.W. Migliaccio, R. Muñoz-Carpena, Y. Khare, Y. C. Li. 2014. Modeling Soil Water Dynamics Considering Measurement Uncertainty. Hydrological Processes. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10173.
Yuan, Y., Y. Khare, X. Wang, P. B. Parajuli, I. Kisekka, and S. Finsterle. 2014. Hydrologic and Water Quality Models: Sensitivity. Trans. ASABE. SW-10611-2014 (in-revision).
 

Kisekka, I., K.W. Migliaccio, R. Muñoz-Carpena, B. Schaffer and Y. Li. 2013. Dynamic Factor Analysis of Surface Water Management Impacts on Soil and Bedrock Water Contents in Southern Florida Lowlands. Journal of Hydrology 488:55–72.


Kisekka, I., K.W. Migliaccio, R. Muñoz-Carpena, Y. Khare, and T. H. Boyer. 2013. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for an approximate analytical model of canal-aquifer interaction applied in the C-111 Basin. Trans. ASABE. 56(3): 977-992.
 

Kisekka, I., K.W. Migliaccio, M.D. Dukes, B. Schaffer, J.H. Crane. 2010. Evapotranspiration-Based Irrigation scheduling and Physiological Response in a Carambola (Averrhoa Carambola L.) Orchard. Applied Engineering in Agriculture 26(3): 373-380.

Conference Proceedings


Kisekka, I., J. Aguilar, F.R. Lamm, and D. H. Rogers. 2014. Using Soil Water and Canopy Temperature to Improve Irrigation Scheduling for Corn. Proceedings of the 2014 Irrigation Association Technical Conference, Phoenix, Arizona, November 19-20, Available from the Irrigation Association, Falls Church, Virginia.


Lamm, F.R., D. H. Rogers., J. Aguilar, and I. Kisekka. 2014. Deficit Irrigation of Grain and Oilseed Crops. Proceedings of the 2014 Irrigation Association Technical Conference, Phoenix, Arizona, November 19-20, Available from the Irrigation Association, Falls Church, Virginia.


Lamm, F.R., D. H. Rogers., J. Aguilar, and I. Kisekka. 2014. Successful SDI - Addressing the Essential Issues. Proceedings of the 26th Annual Central Plains Irrigation Conference, Burlington, CO, February 25-26, 2014. Available from CPIA, 760 N. Thompson, Colby, Kansas.


Kisekka, I., K.W. Migliaccio, and M. D. Dukes. 2010. Evaluation and calibration of radiation-based equations for estimating potential evapotranspiration under Florida’s humid subtropical climate. 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference Proceedings, 5-8 December 2010, Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix, Arizona USA Paper No. IRR10-9604.


Extension publications
Rogers, D. H., J. Aguilar, I. Kisekka, and P. L. Barnes.2014. Soil, Water, and Plant Relationships. Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. L904.
 

Rogers, D. H., J. Aguilar, I. Kisekka, and P. L. Barnes.2014. Important Agricultural Soil Properties. Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. L935.
 

Rogers, D. H., J. Aguilar, I. Kisekka, and P. L. Barnes.2014. Agricultural Crop Water Use. Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. L934. 

Staff
Dennis Tomsicek (Sr. Technician)
Jaylen Koehn (Sr. Technician)
Gia Nguyen (PhD Student)
Dennis Bbosa (PhD Student
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